Wood siding

Wood siding is arguably the oldest and most traditional siding system on the market today and has been used on both residential and commercial buildings for hundreds of years. In these modern times, countless other materials have been introduced with competitive prices and undeniable advantages but natural wood products have still maintained popularity thanks to their warm and rustic appearance. For as long as wood products are financially feasible, they will be used across the construction market because they are environmentally friendly and, in some cases, even reusable while offering a beautifully rustic appeal.

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Beveled Siding

Lap siding is likely the most common style of siding installed on homes across the country. Consisting of thin long planks that are tapered in thickness from top to bottom, the siding is installed one plank at a time with each overlapping the last. By concealing the fasteners and providing a positive overlap, this system becomes very efficient at preventing water from infiltrating the siding while also wicking the water away from the wall system itself. Due to the convenience of the installation, the relatively simple profile and effective performance, wood lap siding has been popular for over a hundred years and continues to be used today.

Cedar Shake

Extremely popular in Western North America, cedar shingles are chosen by homeowners wanting to achieve classic and authentic appearance for their home. Shingles made from many different materials are available on the market today, including vinyl and fiber cement. A shingle siding system consists of multiple rows of small and overlapping wood boards installed side by side, leaving only a small gap between them. Often seen installed within the gables of classic style homes, this type of siding is a great way to add some flare to your home’s appearance.

Tongue and Groove

Easily the most popular of all wood siding products, this profile is seen across the country on both walls and soffit installations. This profile gets its name from the subtle lines created by the fine V-shaped or square line that becomes apparent between each piece of siding as they are installed. Thanks to a groove cut into the bottom of the siding plank and a tongue left at the top that fit together nearly perfectly, this siding system looks seamless once completed. This tongue and groove connection is exceptionally water resistant which can be a huge advantage compared to other wood siding profiles.